“Hello, may name is ______ and I’m an alcoholic drug addict.”

Many of us have been in situations where we have had to utter these words. Sitting in a lazily-formed circle, looking around the room for answers in other’s faces and body language. We saw tired faces, weary from life. We’ve seen faces that looked happier than others, sleepy faces, scarred faces, scared faces, tattooed faces. We’ve seen legs shake in anticipation of speaking, or hands clutching the Big Book as if its the only thing tying that person to the planet.

We’ve been in group therapy.

According to an article in Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series, No. 41group therapy, or group, can be incredibly rewarding for individuals recovering from addiction. These groups can reduce isolation and allow members to watch the recovery of their peers. The group format also addresses common symptoms accompanying drug addiction, such as depression and shame.

Having someone say, “Hey man, I’ve been there too.” Or, “I feel the same exact way!” Can be an incredibly healing experience. Not only can you see that it is possible to make it through whatever you are dealing with, but that person can also give you advice from their own experience.

Humans are social creatures, we crave interpersonal relationships. In the throws of addiction, we may isolate ourselves from those who care about us and therefore cause ourselves more pain.

Although A Man in Recovery does not provide clinical group therapy, and someone seeking that should reach out to a treatment facility, we do offer support groups that are open to anyone.

At these groups we have parents, loved ones and addicts share experiences, in their respective groups, about what they are currently going through or struggling with. Through these groups, participants receive support or advice from a diverse group of individuals and see that they are not alone.

Groups such as this or 12-step programs are an important addition to an addicts recovery, however they cannot replace clinical group therapy. In fact, most treatment facilities make attendance at Alcoholics Anonymous or similar programs mandatory, according to Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series, No. 41. These groups act as a supplement to the treatment process, and should be treated as such.

Sitting in a group of strangers can be terrifying. But, there is no better feeling than watching the transformation of that group from strangers, to friends and finally family.

 

For times, dates and locations of AMIRF support group meetings visit this page. 

 

References:

Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. Substance Abuse Treatment: Group Therapy. Rockville (MD): Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (US); 2005. (Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series, No. 41.) 1 Groups and Substance Abuse Treatment. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK64223/

 

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